Biodiversity and protection

A significant share of the living species in Finland are directly or indirectly dependent on the forests. About 36% of all threatened species live in mineral soil forests. However, only about ten percent of the assessed mineral soil species are threatened. This means that Finnish forests still contain most of the species that naturally occur there. In addition, a few percent of all threatened species live in forested peatlands.

Finnish forestry is based on the management of native tree species. The management of forests seeks to respect their natural growth and mimic the natural cycle of boreal forests. The objective is to secure the production of high-quality timber, and to preserve the biological diversity of forests as well as the preconditions for the multiple use of forest.

Maintenance and enhancement of biological diversity of forests is an integral element of the Finnish forest policy, legislation and practices. In Finland certification systems (PEFC, FSC) drawn up in participatory processes which are independent of any public authorities are widely used on a voluntary basis to ensure the sustainability of forest management.

The backbone of forest biodiversity conservation is the network of protected areas. These are supplemented by voluntary forest protection and biodiversity conservation in commercial forests. Majority of national parks and strict nature reserves are located in northern Finland, thus voluntary forest protection is very important and promoted by the State in southern part of the country.